Monday, October 15, 2018

Great opportunity for Museums, Public Institutions and serius Norval Morrisseau Art Collectors




Presenting thirty-three genuine Norval Morrisseau creations:
/...and other artworks and collectables/

October 20th, 2018 10:00 AM EST


http://www.goldeneagleartgallery.com/

18 Ringwood Dr Unit 1, Stouffville, ON, CA
http://www.goldeneagleartgallery.com/


*Untitled 42"x43" Original Acrylic on Canvas Framed Painting
@ invaluable





























Featured at:















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The following copyrighted information about “Oakwood Auctions” is published with permission of Mr. Larry Groskopf, the owner of the 'Golden Eagle Art Gallery.'

Oakwood Auctions

Auctioning with Integrity


Original Canvas Framed Painting
@ invaluable

Specializing in fine arts and unique collectibles, Oakwood is a Canadian auction house driven by the principle of integrity. Offering personalized, expert service and access to our vast domestic and international networks, Oakwood attracts a wide variety of collectors, dealers and private buyers from across Canada, the United States, Europe and the Far East. Our live online auctions feature a diverse range of unique artwork, sculptures, coins, stamps, antiques, sports memorabilia and other collectibles. In addition to our international auction events, we specialize in facilitating private sales and estate sales, provide accurate appraisals, and offer consignment services in a wide variety of categories. Whether you have an estate to liquidate or single item or collection to consign, you can rely on Oakwood’s seasoned team of experts, marketers and appraisers to deliver in a professional, timely manner.

For over 40 years, our team has been active as bidders and consignors in the auction world. Having experienced and witnessed varying, sometimes disappointing levels of quality and service, Oakwood was established to provide an option for those searching for an auction house they can count on. Whether you want to buy, sell or have a unique item or collection appraised, we are committed to delivering accurate representation, tremendous value and exceptional service. Earning your lasting trust is of paramount importance and our dedication to operating with absolute integrity drives every decision we make.

Our Story


Oakwood was founded by Larry Groskopf, whose involvement in the world of art and collectibles spans 50 years. A serious numismatist and philatelist, his passion was initially born out of a love for coins and stamps. After beginning to trade at the early age of 12, he developed expertise in Canadian and international coins and became a rare coin dealer. Since that time, his appreciation for unique collectibles has expanded into fine art and collectibles.

Larry’s growing passion for art culminated in the establishment of Golden Eagle Art Gallery over 20 years ago. The gallery boasts a diverse collection of quality art and provides representation to many distinguished artists, often exclusively. Golden Eagle’s reputation is rooted in its commitment to offering exceptional art and custom framing matched by quality service. Since establishing its eBay store in 2011, Golden Eagle has maintained a 100 percent positive feedback record – a reflection of the gallery’s mandate of respecting its customers and cultivating of long-term relationships.

Led by the same passionate, principled team, Oakwood will carry on Golden Eagle’s legacy of integrity in business. Featuring extensive collections of stamps, coins, North American and international artwork, sculptures, antiques, sports memorabilia, and a vast array of unique collectibles, Oakwood is firmly committed to providing accurate descriptions and valuations of rarity and condition.

Oakwood Auctions – Auctioning with Integrity. 


In media:




nowtoronto.com






Saturday, October 13, 2018

Norval Morrisseau Exhibition @ AGH


What: An exhibition of 16 paintings by Norval Morrisseau from the Art Gallery of Hamilton's permanent collection.

Where:  Art Gallery of Hamilton, 123 King St. E., Hamilton ONT

When: Official opening is Friday, Oct. 12, 6 to 10 p.m., in conjunction with the opening party for the tenth annual AGH World Film Festival. The exhibition runs through March 17, 2019.

Admission: Free

Website: artgalleryofhamilton.com

"Shaman and Apprentice",  © 1985 Norval Morrisseau
Donated by Nicholas Pustina, Robert Zelinski & Kenny Whent, 1985;
















The following copyrighted online article from “The Hamilton Spectator” is published for Nonprofit purposes & for purposes of informing the Public without permission from the author Graham Rockingham.

The AGH Norval Morrisseau collection finally gets its day


The AGH is home to one of the largest collections of the art of Woodlands artist Norval Morrisseau ... but it’s never reached the walls of the gallery until now

Oct 11, 2018 by Graham Rockingham The Hamilton Spectator 

The paintings of Norval Morrisseau are probably the most recognizable of all Canadian Indigenous artists.

You don't have to be an expert to recognize his style — the neonlike brilliance of the colours, the black outlines behind the characters and the mystical stories they represent.

When you see one, you know it is a Morrisseau. The style is that distinct. It's like a surreal stained glass window on canvas. He has been called the "Picasso of the North" and the founder of the Woodlands School of Canadian art.

For more than 30 years, the Art Gallery of Hamilton has been home to one of the nation's largest collections of the late Anishinaabe artist's work, 117 paintings in all, most of them dating back to the early '80s.

And most are never put on public display. About three dozen have been loaned out to other galleries in as part of Morrisseau exhibitions in Ottawa and Waterloo, but, by and large, the collection has remained hidden from public view, unstretched canvases in the gallery's second-floor vault.

On Friday, 16 of these Morrisseau paintings, all acrylic on canvas, will finally be hung on the walls of two rooms on the AGH's second floor as part of a new exhibition entitled simply "Norval Morrisseau," which runs until March 17. Admission is free.

Nine of the paintings have never been displayed publicly before. Experts from the Canadian Conservation Institute in Ottawa came to assess the collection and stretch the canvasses for display.

For the seven others, the exhibition represents their first viewing in Hamilton (their only other showing was at the University of Waterloo in 1998).


The exhibition is the work of a Tara Ng, a young art historian and curator based in Toronto, with the help of an Ontario Arts Council "culturally diverse curatorial project" grant. Ng was invited by AGH senior curator Tobi Bruce to explore the 10,000 works of art in the AGH and develop an exhibition. 

Ng quickly focused on the 117 items in the Morrisseau collection. The more she studied it, the more she became intrigued. The only comparable collections, she discovered, were at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Que., with more than 130 works, and the Thunder Bay Art Gallery, with more than 100.

All but three of the AGH's Morrisseau paintings came as a gift were donated to the gallery in 1985 by a Thunder Bay law firm. One of the partners in the firm — Nicholas John Pustina — was a Hamilton native and a friend of Morrisseau, who was raised on the Sand Point Ojibwa reservation near Lake Nipigon in northwestern Ontario.

Although the paintings were undated, Ng's research determined that the works in the AGH collection were painted from 1980 to 1985.

"It was a particularly interesting period in Morrisseau's career because, in 1979, he officially announced himself as a shaman artist whose work represented his visions," Ng, 31, explains.

Morrisseau, who died in 2007 at the age of 76, was also involved at the time with the New Age religious movement called Eckankar, which practises "soul travel," a notion that tied in well with the astral projections of shamanism.

"I contacted several institutions across Canada and they don't have very many works by Morrisseau from this period," Ng says. "It's an overlooked period in Morrisseau's career, I suppose partly because so many of them are in the Art Gallery of Hamilton's permanent collection and few people have seen them."

Ng said she found stylistic elements in these paintings that render them distinct from Morrisseau's work from other periods.

"In some of these paintings, like 'Children with Tree of Life,' Morrisseau has used blue form lines whereas typically he used black," Ng says. "The blue form lines give a totally different effect. I think it goes with the fact that he was projecting visions from the astral plane. His black form lines have a much more solid, concrete appearance."

"At night, Morrisseau would say that his soul would travel to the astral plane and bring back images for him to paint," Ng says. "His paintings are also steeped in traditional knowledge. He focuses on the interconnectedness of all creation."

grockingham@thespec.com

905-526-3331 | @RockatTheSpec


The above copyrighted online article from “The Hamilton Spectator” is published for Nonprofit purposes & for purposes of informing the Public without permission from the author Graham Rockingham.




Thursday, October 11, 2018

Remembering the 83rd Anniversary of Harriet Morrisseau's Birthday

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Harriet Morrisseau (Kakegamic)
(October 11th, 1935 - May 11th, 1995)




 













 

Eighty-three years ago today Harriet Morrisseau (Kakegamic) was born...

In 1957 Norval Morrisseau married Harriet Kakegamic (sister of Henry, Joshim and Goyce Kakegamic) who was from Sandy Lake Reserve northeast of Red Lake. They met in Fort William (now Thunder Bay) at the tuberculosis sanatorium while Morrisseau was receiving treatment. They arrived in Cochenour, Ontario in 1959 to work in the Cochenour-Willans gold mine.

Harriet inspired him in his work and taught him Cree syllabics, form of writing developed by Methodist missionary James Evans in the 1840s, reflected in Morrisseau's own signature of his works (Copper Thunderbird).

Their children were born from 1960 - 1975 as the family moved between Beardmore, Cochenour, Sandy Lake, McKenzie Island and Red Lake. Morrisseau reportedly enjoyed children and one large portrait of his daughter, Victoria, with his first grandson ("Victoria and Family"), conveys pride and love.

Norval Morrisseau & Harriet Morrisseau (Kakegamic) have 7 children by direct bloodline (David, Michael, Peter, Eugene, Christian, Victoria and Lisa), 18 Grandchildren and 13 Great Grandchildren.

Note: Norval Morrisseau was buried next to his wife Harriet at cemetery in Keewaywin First Nation, Ontario, Canada.

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Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Remembering Ahmoo Angeconeb (1955-2017)

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"Shamans Talking," 48"x84", © 1977 Allen (Ahmoo) Angeconeb
/Click on image to Enlarge/


Ahmoo Angeconeb is a nationally and internationally celebrated artist from the Lac Seul First Nation near Sioux Lookout. Angeconeb was described by Glenn Allison, former curator of the Thunder Bay Art Gallery, as "the foremost of his generation of Anishnaabe artists, and an apt successor to the achievements of Norval Morrisseau and Roy Thomas".

Angeconeb taught himself how to paint at an early age, and had sold his first painting by the time he was only 13 years old. Four years later, he participated in an art exhibition at the Sault Ste. Marie Public Library and by the time he was 22 he had his first Toronto art exhibit at York University. By then, Angeconeb had spent time in southeast Asia with Canada World Youth and was studying art at York University. He went on to obtain a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Lakehead University in Thunder Bay.

For over twenty years, Angeconeb had concentrated his artistic talent on printmaking, and is considered one of Canada's finest printmakers. In the book "Roy Thomas - The Spirit of Anisnabae Art", author James Stevens comments that Angeconeb's "bold spiritual images are often presented in stark black and white codes that have a haunting and eye pleasing quality". While Angeconeb was a world traveller with an interest in the artwork of indigenous peoples of other cultures, he remained firmly rooted in the forest tradition of his forefathers and mothers. He said "I am glad to be a part of the Anishinaabe visual tradition that comes from our ancestors who have created art for a thousand years".

Angeconeb's work has been displayed in shows and galleries in Europe, the United States, and Canada. Throughout his career as an artist, Angeconeb had also worked as an educator, teaching both children and adults about traditional and contemporary modes of art practise while educating them about the ways of the Anishnaabe. -

He participated in the Woodland Arts Festival in July of 2008, where he offerred a half-day workshop on drawing and relief printmaking. The workshop also included information about the history of Anishnaabe art. He was assisted by Christina Krebs. Krebs, originally from Switzerland, is an artist herself who was completing a Ph.D. on the roles of the Anishnaabe artists, especially the second and third generation of Woodland artists.-

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Source (image): "The Sound of the Drum: THE SACRED ART OF THE ANISHNABEC" by Mary E. (Beth) Southcott; Published by The Boston Mills Press; ISBN: 0-919822-64-9


>>> Reference posts: - Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part I) /Carl Ray/ - Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part II) /Daphne Odjig/ - Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part III) /Benjamin Chee Chee/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part IV) /Jackson Beardy/ - Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part V) /Joshim Kakegamic/ - Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part VI) /Roy Thomas/ - Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part VII) /Arthur Shilling/ - Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part VIII) /Alex Janvier/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part IX) /Eddy Cobiness/ - Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part X) /Martin Panamick/ - Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XI) /James A. Simon - MISHIBINIJIMA/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XII) /Carl Beam/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XIII) /Norman Knott/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XIV) /Clemence Wescoupe/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XV) /Cecil Youngfox/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XVI) /Goyce Kakegamic/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XVII) /Leland Bell BEBAMINOJMAT/,
- Red Lake Woodland Arts Festival: A Tribute to Norval Morrisseau and the Woodland Artists in 24 DAYS! & - Ahmoo's Prayer - Drawings from Obishikokkang. - * The painting in this post: "Shamans Talking", 48"x84", © 1977 Allen (Ahmoo) Angeconeb /Private Collection/

Monday, October 8, 2018

Norval Morrisseau Blog as an instrument in preserving the Legacy of Norval Morrisseau

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Kevin Hearn Vs. Joseph B. McLeod and Maslak McLeod Gallery Inc.
/Court File No. CV-12-455650/

"SPIRIT ENERGY OF MOTHER EARTH HAS NOT BEEN PROVED TO BE A FORGED OR FAKE MORRISEAU. FROM THE LAW'S POINT OF VIEW, IT IS THEREFORE A REAL NORVAL MORRISSEAU PAINTING."-

~ Justice Edward M. Morgan, May 24, 2018

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"How was it possible for this youth to reach back to the old feelings, to conceive the images that would bear the unmistakable stamp of his people? How could this firm pride originate in a community relegated to the status of third class citizens, constantly reminded of this status and defeated by it? What was there about this lad that earned for him in a medicine woman's dream the combined names of a powerful spirit and the metal traditionally sacred to the Lake Superior Ojibway - Copper Thunderbird?"
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Selwyn Dewdney (1909 - 1979)

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