Monday, December 13, 2010

Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XVIII)

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Ahmoo Angeconeb (b. 1955)
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"Shamans Talking", 48"x84", © 1977 Allen (Ahmoo) Angeconeb
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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Ahmoo Angeconeb is a nationally and internationally celebrated artist from the Lac Seul First Nation near Sioux Lookout. Angeconeb is described by Glenn Allison, former curator of the Thunder Bay Art Gallery, as "the foremost of his generation of Anishnaabe artists, and an apt successor to the achievements of Norval Morrisseau and Roy Thomas".
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Angeconeb taught himself how to paint at an early age, and had sold his first painting by the time he was only 13 years old. Four years later, he participated in an art exhibition at the Sault Ste. Marie Public Library and by the time he was 22 he had his first Toronto art exhibit at York University. By then, Angeconeb had spent time in southeast Asia with Canada World Youth and was studying art at York University. He went on to obtain a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Lakehead University in Thunder Bay.
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For over twenty years, Angeconeb has concentrated his artistic talent on printmaking, and is considered one of Canada's finest printmakers. In the book "Roy Thomas - The Spirit of Anisnabae Art", author James Stevens comments that Angeconeb's "bold spiritual images are often presented in stark black and white codes that have a haunting and eye pleasing quality". While Angeconeb is a world traveller with an interest in the artwork of indigenous peoples of other cultures, he remains firmly rooted in the forest tradition of his forefathers and mothers. He says "I am glad to be a part of the Anishinaabe visual tradition that comes from our ancestors who have created art for a thousand years".
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Angeconeb's work has been displayed in shows and galleries in Europe, the United States, and Canada. Throughout his career as an artist, Angeconeb has also worked as an educator, teaching both children and adults about traditional and contemporary modes of art practise while educating them about the ways of the Anishnaabe. -

He participated in the Woodland Arts Festival in July of 2008, where he offerred a half-day workshop on drawing and relief printmaking. The workshop also included information about the history of Anishnaabe art. He was assisted by Christina Krebs. Krebs, originally from Switzerland, is an artist herself who was completing a Ph.D. on the roles of the Anishnaabe artists, especially the second and third generation of Woodland artists.-

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Source (image): "The Sound of the Drum: THE SACRED ART OF THE ANISHNABEC" by Mary E. (Beth) Southcott; Published by The Boston Mills Press; ISBN: 0-919822-64-9
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>>> Reference posts:
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part I) /Carl Ray/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part II) /Daphne Odjig/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part III) /Benjamin Chee Chee/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part IV) /Jackson Beardy/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part V) /Joshim Kakegamic/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part VI) /Roy Thomas/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part VII) /Arthur Shilling/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part VIII) /Alex Janvier/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part IX) /Eddy Cobiness/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part X) /Martin Panamick/
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Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XI) /James A. Simon - MISHIBINIJIMA/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XII) /Carl Beam/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XIII) /Norman Knott/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XIV) /Clemence Wescoupe/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XV) /Cecil Youngfox/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XVI) /Goyce Kakegamic/,
- Great Anishinaabe/Woodland Artists (Part XVII) /Leland Bell BEBAMINOJMAT/,
- Red Lake Woodland Arts Festival: A Tribute to Norval Morrisseau and the Woodland Artists in 24 DAYS! & - Ahmoo's Prayer - Drawings from Obishikokkang.
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* The painting in this post: "Shamans Talking", 48"x84", © 1977 Allen (Ahmoo) Angeconeb /Private Collection/

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