Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Red Lake Woodland Arts Festival: A Tribute to Norval Morrisseau and the Woodland Artists in 3 DAYS!

July 4th-6th, 2008
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Canada Day 2008 / Fête du Canada 2008
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"Meegwetch Norval for the Legacy you left behind!"
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Banner by © Calvin Comber
/Created for 2004 Outdoor Art Gallery Project/
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This weekend, Red Lake will host the first ever Red Lake Woodland Arts Festival: A Tribute to Norval Morrisseau and the Woodland Artists. The festival will take visitors on a special journey as they discover the untold story of the artist’s life, from 1959 when he arrived in Red Lake to work as a miner, to when he left the area around 1973. The father of seven children, Norval Morrisseau has gained international recognition as the founder of the Woodland School of Art, and has been frequently referred to as the “Picasso of the North”.

Norval Morrisseau was inspired by the Ojibwa medicine society birchbark scrolls and by the pictographs and petroglyphs found throughout northern Ontario. Today about 400 artists have become Morrisseau acolytes, adopting the style to their own visions. During his career Norval Morrisseau is believed to have created more than 10,000 pieces of art.

The festival will feature a variety of activities that will celebrate the Aboriginal culture, including story-telling, guided walking tours, plays, dance performances and art workshops. Also planned is an art fair, an art exhibition, audio-visual presentations and panel discussions. In addition, there will be ample opportunities for young people to meet the guest artists informally.

Organized by the Red Lake Regional Heritage Centre, in collaboration with local Aboriginal organizations and artists from across Ontario, the festival will also bring together senior, mid-career and emerging Aboriginal artists, family members, art lovers, collectors, gallery owners, writers, art historians and many others.
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For more information about the Red Lake Woodland Arts Festival go to: www.redlakemuseum.com.
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