Friday, March 7, 2008

Tonight, Norval Morrisseau will posthumously receive the National Aboriginal Lifetime Achievement Award for 2008

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© 2006 Bruno Schlumberger/CanWest News Service
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"Norval Morrisseau's most significant and enduring achievement will be measured over generations as the lasting impact of his greatest ambition - to instill pride - makes itself felt in the art of new artists compelled to create by his masterful paintings."
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Greg A. Hill - Curator of Indigenous Art at the National Gallery of Canada
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- The Gala ceremony of the 15th National Aboriginal Achievement Awards will be broadcasted at 8pm ET/PT on Saturday, March 22 on Global Television and Saturday, April 5 on APTN.
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* The above photograph of of Norval Morrisseau taken in Otawa in February, 2006 at the opening of the "Norval Morrisseau - Shaman Artist" exhibition. It was the first solo exhibition featuring a First Nations artist in 126-year history of the National Gallery of Canada

4 comments:

ink guy said...

any thoughts on how long a painting like this might take Norval to complete?

Bryant Ross said...

The painting "Cause and Effect" that Norval did for the Magicians de la Terre exhibition for the French Bi-cenntenial in Paris (1989) was similar in size. It was 18' x 12" and took him about 2 months to complete.

Anonymous said...

Would that be 2 months solely devoted to this painting or would he also be known to work on additional pieces while working on large canvas like "Cause and Effect"?

AP

Bryant Ross said...

He did work on some other pieces at the same time, but not many. He was under a time restrant to get the large canvas completed. In fact he worked on "Cause and Effect" right up to the last day before taking it to France. When we finaly had it stretched and hung in the museum he still had to do some touch up and sign them. The painting was to large for the room he was given to display in. So we hung 2 panels together on one wall and the third panel by itself on another wall. So when he signed them he signed one signature on the two panel section and one signature on the single panel. That is why this painting has 2 signatures, with one panel (the top one) without a signature.